Unusually High Number of Entries (+16,312.7%) in the Final Hours — March 2023 Giveaway — Legion 7 Slim

I took screenshots to record my entries.  By doing that, I also captured the total entries for the giveaway.  Over 7 days, the average hourly entries were +46.58.

But, over the final 15 hoursthe average hourly entries jumped to +7,644.35a +16,312.7% increase (164×"Normal").

Can anyone explain this, please?

Here are my data and calculations:

UID Date-Time Screenshot Total Entries ΔEntries ΔTime Avg Entries/Hour
1 2023-04-01 18:06:29  37,901 0 00:00:00 N/A
2 2023-04-02 05:35:37  38,617 +716 +11:29:08 +62.26
3 2023-04-03 21:27:42  40,710 +2,093 +39:52:05 +52.50
4 2023-04-05 10:43:49  42,739 +2,029 +37:16:07 +54.44
5 2023-04-06 02:18:14  43,755 +1,016 +15:34:25 +65.27
6 2023-04-07 12:47:41  45,448 +1,693 +34:29:27 +40.07
7 2023-04-08 03:55:54  46,227 +779 +15:08:13 +51.49
8 2023-04-09 13:29:43  47,989 +1,762 +33:33:49 +52.49
9 2023-04-10 04:28:35  162,824 +114,835 +14:58:52 +7,644.35
Parents
  • I appreciate the transparency in your answer Ben.  M0rn, I think your concerns about fraud control are valid, but Ben is just an end user of Gleam, in the end he's got a limited set of tools to check against fraud and the quality check for content is a good one.  Hopefully Ben has been in touch with Gleam about this and their devs can examine the issue and the underlying data in order to deploy an improved version of the platform that better protects against these types of attacks.

  • I forgot to mention... I meant to reply to you 10 days ago.  But, I got distracted.  Again.

  • Seems like you managed to get someone's attention.  The entry count dropped 20k entries yesterday!  Maybe Ben and Gleam had a little security sit-down?  I'm sure you're still keeping an eye on this.

Reply
  • Seems like you managed to get someone's attention.  The entry count dropped 20k entries yesterday!  Maybe Ben and Gleam had a little security sit-down?  I'm sure you're still keeping an eye on this.

Children
  • I am keeping an eye on this.  Though, life has just thrown my family a pretty big curve ball.

    I believe that this had someone's attention, before I noticed or mentioned it.  I am hoping  will take on the mantle of investigator.  Coordinating and cooperating with federal, state, and local authorities.  Even if my primary hypothesis proves to be incorrect, this time, I suspect it will be or has been true.

    I, however, cannot devote much time to this, anymore.

    If you are interested, I suggest you watch a video¹.

    Early in my freshman year at university (Fall 1992), I proposed a hypothesis to my suite-mate.  He attended a prestigious high school in NYC, called Stuyvesant.  When he graduated high school, he already had 3–4 years of Comp. Sci. classes.  I had only 1 semester — the only Comp. Sci. class my high school offered — reinforcing and extending my knowledge of BASIC.

    Curiously, however, I graduated with many more AP² and SUPA³ credits than he did.  Which never made sense to me.  Anyway...

    The hypothesis I proposed: what prevents a compiler from inserting unwanted code into our binaries?  That is, how can we trust that our compiled code matches our source code?

    He knew me well enough, at that point, to ask (rather than assume), "Have you ever heard of Ken Thompson?"  I had not.  He then explained, less clearly and less concisely, the gist of the content in the video: Reflections on Trusting Trust - Computerphile.

    My suspicions tend to be proven correct.  Usually, only in part.  Occasionally, however, I get the whole thing right.

    Beware trusting anyone or anything — until we verify they are worthy of trust⁴.

    ¹

    ² Advanced Placement — college credits from an exam, based on an independent curriculum.

    ³ Syracuse University Project Advance — college credits from Syracuse University, based on Syracuse University's curriculum; includes a library card, student ID, and a transcript from Syracuse University.

    ⁴ Paraphrases an old, Russian proverb: "Doveryai, no proveryai."  In English, "Trust, but verify."