Can gaming and business share the same computer?

I run an accounting and tax business with my computer.  Sometimes I need a break and play games.  Can these two venues share the same computer? 

Parents
  • I'm going to answer from two angles as I'm not sure the type of answer you're looking for.

    Depending on the specs of the computer and the initial intent of purchase, you can tell whether it's capable of gaming. Considering what you've mentioned, which I'm assuming aren't power consuming programs, you may not get away with a wide selection of games. This is simply going off what you've written and would help if you could provide a make and model and any after-purchase upgrades you may have made.

    My second thought was coming from the mindset of solely using the computer for work so that's all you think about and have access to do. Many people opt for having multiple computers for different purposes, so they only assume it with or use it for what they bought it for. If your specs check out as being a computer that can run games decently, I'd then recommend making a secondary profile just for gaming, so you don't end up mixing the two. This can help aid in preventing distraction (should that happen to be an issue) and keep everything nice and organized so there aren't any cross-pollinating programs, media, or files.

    As I mentioned, if you can comment with the make and model of your computer, it would help us help you in answering if it's physically capable of running games. All computers can run games though, whether it's in a browser or downloaded from a store like Steam, so this also depends on what types of games you wish to play as well. Whichever way you intended for this question to lead, I hope my response helps!

Reply
  • I'm going to answer from two angles as I'm not sure the type of answer you're looking for.

    Depending on the specs of the computer and the initial intent of purchase, you can tell whether it's capable of gaming. Considering what you've mentioned, which I'm assuming aren't power consuming programs, you may not get away with a wide selection of games. This is simply going off what you've written and would help if you could provide a make and model and any after-purchase upgrades you may have made.

    My second thought was coming from the mindset of solely using the computer for work so that's all you think about and have access to do. Many people opt for having multiple computers for different purposes, so they only assume it with or use it for what they bought it for. If your specs check out as being a computer that can run games decently, I'd then recommend making a secondary profile just for gaming, so you don't end up mixing the two. This can help aid in preventing distraction (should that happen to be an issue) and keep everything nice and organized so there aren't any cross-pollinating programs, media, or files.

    As I mentioned, if you can comment with the make and model of your computer, it would help us help you in answering if it's physically capable of running games. All computers can run games though, whether it's in a browser or downloaded from a store like Steam, so this also depends on what types of games you wish to play as well. Whichever way you intended for this question to lead, I hope my response helps!

Children
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