New PC Help

What would be a good PC for someone just getting into PC gaming? I'm not looking for a super computer, just something that will run games like Assassin's Creed and Call of Duty well. Additionally, what's a PC that could run Rust somewhat decently? Looking for a pre-built PC, any advice helps and thank you in advance!

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  • There is not one right answer here. Look at the specs and requirements for each game or program you want to use. Find some computers that are in your price range and exceed the minimum and recommended requirements. Try to get the best one with the highest specs you can afford. Invest in quality so you don't have to buy another one every year. Future proofing as a Rule of Thumb. I don't know your personal needs or preferences (price range, laptop/desktop/handheld) so I can't be much more specific. Have you had problems running any of these before?

    This link should help. There's a drop down that lets you choose your games and tells you which ones can handle that many FPS. Good luck

    www.lenovo.com/.../

    Also, consider refurbished. Cheaper because it's used, but the company renewed it, so you can afford something better and more powerful.

  •   

      makes the most important point for most PC gamers:

    "Future proofing as a Rule of Thumb."

    Unless a gamer plans on playing games made before a certain year—like 2006—game publishers are making it harder and harder to continue playing our favorite games into the future.  If we want to keep playing, we must buy the latest version of the game.  For online games, publishers encourage new purchases by shutting down older game servers—including multiplayer-only games.

    Even single-player games/modes are not safe.  Some games require connecting to a publisher's server just to launch the game—including singe-player. smh

    If I were you, I wouldn't cheap-out on the system too much.  Otherwise, you may be upgrading your hardware as often as you're upgrading your game library.

     From what I've seen on Lenovo's store, this rig is the "sweet-spot" (link opens new tab or window):

    Legion Tower 5 Gen 8 (AMD) with RTX 4070 Ti Super

    PROS:

    • AMD Zen 4 (Ryzen 7 7700)
      • 8c/16t
      • Base clock: 3.8 GHz
      • Max. boost: 5.3 GHz¹
      • Default TDP: 65W
        • Tjmax: 95℃
      • Integrated graphics: AMD Radeon (RDNA 2)
    • Nvidia Ada Lovelace (GeForce RTX 4070 Ti Super)
      • 16 GB GDDR6X²
      • 256-bit memory bus³
      • NV encode/decode
      • CUDA (GPU-compute)
      • 1×HDMI 2.1
      • 3×DisplayPort 1.4a
    • 32 GB DDR5-5200 (UDIMM—2×16 GB)⁴
    • 1 TB m.2 NVMe 2280 PCIe Gen 4 (performance) TLC⁵
    • 850W power supply
    • Plenty of air cooling
      • Front: 2×120 mm fans
      • Rear: 1×120 mm fan
      • CPU tower cooler w/ 120 mm fan
      • 150 Watts of cooling
      • No risk of leaks, gunk build-up, or pump failure
    • Plenty of USB ports
      • Front: 2×USB-A
      • Rear: 6×USB-A + 1×USB-C
    • Plenty of 3.5 mm audio jacks
      • Front: 2×Headphone+Microphone
      • Rear: Microphone (pink) + Line-out (green) + Line-in (blue)
    • Wi-Fi 6E 2×2 AX + Bluetooth 5.1 (or above)
      • the "good kind" of Wi-Fi 6
        • like Wi-Fi 7, but Wi-Fi 6E supports fewer total devices

     CONS:

    • No 3D V-Cache on the CPU, like the Ryzen 7 7700X3D—really helps with poorly optimized games, like Cyberpunk 2077, and to future-proof a gaming PC
    • No Thunderbolt or USB4
      • i.e. no support for PCIe tunneling⁶
    • Only 1 USB-C 3.2 Gen 2
      • USB-C 3.x Gen 2×2 provides (nominal) 20 Gbps data connection (128/132 comm. protocol uses 3% of bandwidth)
      • Located at the back? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
    • No USB 3.x Gen 2 at the front
      • Both of the front USB-A ports are 3.2 Gen 1
      • USB-A 3.x Gen 1×1 provides (nominal) 5 Gbps data connection (8/10 comm. protocol uses 20% of bandwidth)
    • RJ45 Gigabit Ethernet (1 Gbps?)
      • given the capabilities of the rest of the hardware, 2.5 Gbps (or 10 Gbps) Ethernet makes more sense—although completely unnecessary for gaming and streaming.  4K gaming + 4K streaming utilizes ≈30 Mbps (5 Mbps + 25 Mbps)—you'll run out of CPU and GPU before you'll run out of Ethernet bandwidth.

    (1) Max. boost clock (single-core) matters more to (most) games than number of cores.  Most games do not run as multi-threaded processes—or they do it poorly. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    (2) More VRAM will be needed for future games.  Some modern games barely run on 8 GB GDDR6(X).  Also... if you are interested in playing with (local) AI models, like Stable Diffusion, then 16 GB VRAM is the minimum requirement for GPU-compute (CUDA).  GPU-compute is many times faster than CPU-compute—only utilizes 1–2 CPU cores.  Running a GPU-compute job leaves the remaining CPU cores available for other applications.

    (3) Anything less than 256-bit memory bus limits graphics performance.  Bus-limited graphics is another enemy of future proofing.  I believe Nvidia downgraded the memory bus on their lower-tier cards (e.g. RTX 4060 Ti 16 GB GDDR6X) to 128-bit, because they'd perform too well against their higher-tier cards (e.g. RTX 4080/4090)—negatively impacting $1,700 (MSRP) "flagship" sales. smh

    (4) DDR5-5200 is the maximum supported by the Ryzen 7 7700.  32 GB is plenty of system memory for gaming and many other applications—including "beyond gaming" use-cases.  2×16 GB UDIMM means 2 slots remain available, so upgrading to 64 GB can be as easy as installing another 32 GB (2×16 GB) DDR5-5200 kit.  Unfortunately, matching system memory is not foolproof.  Worst case... by the time you need to upgrade to 64 GB, a 4×16 GB DDR5-5200 kit is as cheap as a 32 GB kit, today. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    (5) TLC → Triple-Layer Cell (3-bit NAND cells).  "Performance" → (hopefully) DRAM or SLC (Single-Layer Cell) cache, to maximize all 4 PCIe Gen4 lanes on m.2.  1 TB is plenty to start.  Although Lenovo's product page doesn't mention it, I'd be surprised if there isn't another m.2 slot (to expand storage) and a SATA3 header (to expand storage).  If not, the USB-C 3.2 Gen 2×2 (20 Gbps) port will make adding high-speed, external storage very easy.

    (6) PCIe tunneling (via Thunderbolt, USB4, and OCuLink) supports external PCIe hardware, like an external GPU (or GPU enclosures), with PCIe Gen4×4 or PCIe Gen3×8; i.e. 40 Gbps data bandwidth (minimum) + low-latency, PCIe tunneling protocol (128/130).  Think of it as an external PCIe slot.  At the 40 Gbps minimum, however, it's only compatible with last-gen (Nvidia 30-series) and budget (Nvidia RTX 4050) graphics cards.  PCIe tunneling has applications for other devices; like a high-speed storage array (DAS), advanced networking, or machine-learning devices (e.g. Tenstorrent GraySkull).

Reply
  •   

      makes the most important point for most PC gamers:

    "Future proofing as a Rule of Thumb."

    Unless a gamer plans on playing games made before a certain year—like 2006—game publishers are making it harder and harder to continue playing our favorite games into the future.  If we want to keep playing, we must buy the latest version of the game.  For online games, publishers encourage new purchases by shutting down older game servers—including multiplayer-only games.

    Even single-player games/modes are not safe.  Some games require connecting to a publisher's server just to launch the game—including singe-player. smh

    If I were you, I wouldn't cheap-out on the system too much.  Otherwise, you may be upgrading your hardware as often as you're upgrading your game library.

     From what I've seen on Lenovo's store, this rig is the "sweet-spot" (link opens new tab or window):

    Legion Tower 5 Gen 8 (AMD) with RTX 4070 Ti Super

    PROS:

    • AMD Zen 4 (Ryzen 7 7700)
      • 8c/16t
      • Base clock: 3.8 GHz
      • Max. boost: 5.3 GHz¹
      • Default TDP: 65W
        • Tjmax: 95℃
      • Integrated graphics: AMD Radeon (RDNA 2)
    • Nvidia Ada Lovelace (GeForce RTX 4070 Ti Super)
      • 16 GB GDDR6X²
      • 256-bit memory bus³
      • NV encode/decode
      • CUDA (GPU-compute)
      • 1×HDMI 2.1
      • 3×DisplayPort 1.4a
    • 32 GB DDR5-5200 (UDIMM—2×16 GB)⁴
    • 1 TB m.2 NVMe 2280 PCIe Gen 4 (performance) TLC⁵
    • 850W power supply
    • Plenty of air cooling
      • Front: 2×120 mm fans
      • Rear: 1×120 mm fan
      • CPU tower cooler w/ 120 mm fan
      • 150 Watts of cooling
      • No risk of leaks, gunk build-up, or pump failure
    • Plenty of USB ports
      • Front: 2×USB-A
      • Rear: 6×USB-A + 1×USB-C
    • Plenty of 3.5 mm audio jacks
      • Front: 2×Headphone+Microphone
      • Rear: Microphone (pink) + Line-out (green) + Line-in (blue)
    • Wi-Fi 6E 2×2 AX + Bluetooth 5.1 (or above)
      • the "good kind" of Wi-Fi 6
        • like Wi-Fi 7, but Wi-Fi 6E supports fewer total devices

     CONS:

    • No 3D V-Cache on the CPU, like the Ryzen 7 7700X3D—really helps with poorly optimized games, like Cyberpunk 2077, and to future-proof a gaming PC
    • No Thunderbolt or USB4
      • i.e. no support for PCIe tunneling⁶
    • Only 1 USB-C 3.2 Gen 2
      • USB-C 3.x Gen 2×2 provides (nominal) 20 Gbps data connection (128/132 comm. protocol uses 3% of bandwidth)
      • Located at the back? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
    • No USB 3.x Gen 2 at the front
      • Both of the front USB-A ports are 3.2 Gen 1
      • USB-A 3.x Gen 1×1 provides (nominal) 5 Gbps data connection (8/10 comm. protocol uses 20% of bandwidth)
    • RJ45 Gigabit Ethernet (1 Gbps?)
      • given the capabilities of the rest of the hardware, 2.5 Gbps (or 10 Gbps) Ethernet makes more sense—although completely unnecessary for gaming and streaming.  4K gaming + 4K streaming utilizes ≈30 Mbps (5 Mbps + 25 Mbps)—you'll run out of CPU and GPU before you'll run out of Ethernet bandwidth.

    (1) Max. boost clock (single-core) matters more to (most) games than number of cores.  Most games do not run as multi-threaded processes—or they do it poorly. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    (2) More VRAM will be needed for future games.  Some modern games barely run on 8 GB GDDR6(X).  Also... if you are interested in playing with (local) AI models, like Stable Diffusion, then 16 GB VRAM is the minimum requirement for GPU-compute (CUDA).  GPU-compute is many times faster than CPU-compute—only utilizes 1–2 CPU cores.  Running a GPU-compute job leaves the remaining CPU cores available for other applications.

    (3) Anything less than 256-bit memory bus limits graphics performance.  Bus-limited graphics is another enemy of future proofing.  I believe Nvidia downgraded the memory bus on their lower-tier cards (e.g. RTX 4060 Ti 16 GB GDDR6X) to 128-bit, because they'd perform too well against their higher-tier cards (e.g. RTX 4080/4090)—negatively impacting $1,700 (MSRP) "flagship" sales. smh

    (4) DDR5-5200 is the maximum supported by the Ryzen 7 7700.  32 GB is plenty of system memory for gaming and many other applications—including "beyond gaming" use-cases.  2×16 GB UDIMM means 2 slots remain available, so upgrading to 64 GB can be as easy as installing another 32 GB (2×16 GB) DDR5-5200 kit.  Unfortunately, matching system memory is not foolproof.  Worst case... by the time you need to upgrade to 64 GB, a 4×16 GB DDR5-5200 kit is as cheap as a 32 GB kit, today. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    (5) TLC → Triple-Layer Cell (3-bit NAND cells).  "Performance" → (hopefully) DRAM or SLC (Single-Layer Cell) cache, to maximize all 4 PCIe Gen4 lanes on m.2.  1 TB is plenty to start.  Although Lenovo's product page doesn't mention it, I'd be surprised if there isn't another m.2 slot (to expand storage) and a SATA3 header (to expand storage).  If not, the USB-C 3.2 Gen 2×2 (20 Gbps) port will make adding high-speed, external storage very easy.

    (6) PCIe tunneling (via Thunderbolt, USB4, and OCuLink) supports external PCIe hardware, like an external GPU (or GPU enclosures), with PCIe Gen4×4 or PCIe Gen3×8; i.e. 40 Gbps data bandwidth (minimum) + low-latency, PCIe tunneling protocol (128/130).  Think of it as an external PCIe slot.  At the 40 Gbps minimum, however, it's only compatible with last-gen (Nvidia 30-series) and budget (Nvidia RTX 4050) graphics cards.  PCIe tunneling has applications for other devices; like a high-speed storage array (DAS), advanced networking, or machine-learning devices (e.g. Tenstorrent GraySkull).

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